Street Smart – Urban Art

From scrawls on walls to guerilla street art, paste-ups and commissioned coverings, there are mixed media messages all around us. Sometimes thought provoking, often temporary, even the biggest names can be cleaned away overnight so enjoy them while you can. Here are a few that caught my eye, some grander than others, all taken in Worthing and Brighton…

I don’t have details for all the artists shown, feel free to let us know if you can fill in any gaps. Some of those whose work is featured above can be found on the following Instagram links:
Mick Mowgli  |  Horace  |  Minty  |  Broken Hartist  |  The Postman

Photos © 16 Beasley St Photography

25th August 2020

Exhibition – Bill Brandt | Henry Moore (The Hepworth Wakefield)

Exhibition, The Hepworth Wakefield, 1st August – 1st November 2020
Bill Brandt | Henry Moore

Header image: Bill Brandt, Henry Moore, 1948, gelatine silver print, Hyman Collection London © Bill Brandt / Bill Brandt Archive Ltd – reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation

Photographer Bill Brandt (1904-1983) and sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986) first met during the Second World War, when they were commissioned by the UK government to create images of civilians sheltering from the bombings of Blitz in the London Underground. Over 50 years later, this initial link forms the basis of an exhibition currently housed at The Hepworth Wakefield, newly reopened since the weekend.

The Hepworth Wakefield © Hufton & Crow

Bill Brandt is recognised as one of the masters of 20th century photography, his work ranging from social documentary to surrealism. His role as staff photographer for the Home Office brought him to the wartime role – he had already been capturing life in the capital for some years, contributing to magazines and publishing two books, The English at Home (1936) and A Night in London (1938). His later work included distorted nudes, portraits and landscapes.

Bill Brandt, Nude, East Sussex Coast, gelatine silver print, 1960,
Bill Brandt Archive London © Bill Brandt / Bill Brandt Archive Ltd

In the 1940s, Henry Moore was commissioned by the War Artists’ Advisory Committee to produce illustrations  of the work being carried out in collieries where the ‘Bevin Boys’ were conscripted to mine for the coal used to fuel armaments factories. The style of these drawings and those that he made of the mass air raid shelters are very similar, using wax crayon, watercolour, pen and ink. Better known for his monumental brass sculpted forms, Moore went on to become one of the best known names in sculpture, his influence still strong amongst many successors.

Henry Moore, Two Piece Reclining Figure No 4, 1961, bronze
The Hepworth Wakefield (Wakefield Permanent Art Collection)
Photo © Jonte Wilde

The exhibition charts the journey of both artists as their paths continued to cross over the years. Further details from the press release below:

‘Organised in partnership with the Yale Center for British Art, the exhibition will bring together over 200 works including major sculptures, iconic photographs, drawings, little-known photo collages, unprinted negatives and rare original colour transparencies. Bill Brandt | Henry Moore will reveal the interdisciplinary range of these two artists, exploring how they both responded creatively to the British landscape and communities during the turbulent times in which they lived.

The exhibition will open with the moment the artists met in 1942 when Brandt photographed Moore in his studio to accompany a 10-page spread in Lilliput magazine juxtaposing the two artists’ shelter pictures. Brandt was a regular contributor as a photojournalist to Lilliput, a magazine known for its innovative photographic features, and this issue was the first time the two artists’ work was shown side-by-side.

Both artists were often drawn to similar subjects – leading up to and during the Second World War, there was a focus on ordinary people, the home and labour. Brandt’s bleakly evocative photographs of impoverished mining communities and families in the North of England taken in the late 1930s reflect social deprivation. Moore’s later sketches documenting the civilian war effort at his father’s colliery in his home-town of Castleford, although similar in theme, present a more optimistic view…

Henry Moore, Pit Boys at Pit Head, 1942,
pencil, pen, ink, wax coloured crayon & watercolour wash
The Hepworth Wakefield (Wakefield Permanent Art Collection)

The exhibition will reveal the important relationship for both artists between 2D images and 3D objects. Moore will be presented as a sculptor and draftsman who made a serious commitment to photography both as a creative medium and a means of presenting his work. On display will be little-known photographs of his sculptures, drawn on and collaged together to develop new ideas for future sculpture. Brandt will be revealed as a photographer who looked to sculpture as a subject and as a way of considering nature, landscape, and the human body, as exemplified by a series of rare colour transparencies of sculptural rock formations on the beach.

Bill Brandt |Henry Moore will also examine the complicated relationship between pictures and objects, between ‘primary’ works of art and ‘secondary’ published images used as an important means of disseminating their work to a wide public, and the material nature of the printed photograph.’

Bill Brandt | Henry Moore runs at The Hepworth Wakefield from 1st August – 1st November 2020, after which it will move to Sainsbury Centre, Norwich from 21st November 2020 – 28th February 2021. The exhibition is supported by The Henry Moore Foundation, Hiscox and The Hepworth Wakefield Contemporary Circle.

Social distancing means that numbers in the gallery at any one time will be limited and this may result in short waits during busy times. No cash payments are currently being accepted and booking is advisable; please check the website for updates before visiting and if you are feeling unwell please stay at home.

The Hepworth Wakefield, Gallery Walk, Wakefield, West Yorkshire WF1 5AW 
Opening times are currently restricted to Wed – Sun 10am – 5pm
Tickets £7.50 / £5 / free for Members, Wakefield residents and under 16s; various permanent exhibitions and the gallery gardens are open free of charge

Sir Michael Craig- Martin, Pitchfork (Yellow), 2013
on display in The Hepworth Wakefield Garden
Photo © Nick Singleton

All images and exhibition details are reproduced with permission from The Hepworth Wakefield and are copyrighted / owned as credited

Intro by Siobhan

4th August 2020

Exhibitions – Tate Reopening

Header image: Tate Modern
The Blavatnik Building Stairwell 3 © Iwan Baan

Exciting news for art lovers as Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool, Tate Modern and Tate St Ives all open their doors to the public again today, having had no option than to close over the past few months to meet quarantine regulations.

Visitors will finally be able to access the galleries and collections, including some exhibitions that have been given specially extended run dates and others that will be starting at a new later date to allow more viewings. This offers a very welcome return to accessing the arts and seeing some outstanding pieces of work up close.

Current and upcoming exhibitions are listed below; there’s sure to be something in amongst this selection to tempt you…

Tate Britain (London)

© Tate Photography

Aubrey Beardsley – until 20th September 2020

Steve McQueen Year 3 – until 31st January 2021

Turner’s Modern World – 28th October 2020 – 7th March 2021

Lynette Yiadom-Boakye – 18th November 2020 – 9th May 2021

Installation view – Steve McQueen Year 3 at Tate Britain © Tate
(part of a huge project to photograph Year 3 pupils across London)

Tate Liverpool

© Rachel Ryan Photography

Mikhail Karikis – 27th July 2020 – 22nd November 2020

Don McCullin – 16th September 2020 – 9th May 2021

Don McCullin, Liverpool c. 1970
© Don McCullin

Tate Modern (London)

The Blavatnik Building © Iwan Baan

Hyundai Commission: Kara Walker Fons Americanus – until 8th November 2020

Andy Warhol – until 15th November 2020

Bruce Nauman – 7th October 2020 – 21st February 2021

Zanele Muholi – 5th November 2020 – 7th March 2021

Bruce Nauman, VIOLINS VIOLENCE SILENCE 1981–2
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland
© ARS, NY and DACS, London 2019

Tate St Ives

© Dennis Gilbert

Naum Gabo – until 27th September 2020

Haegue Yang – 24th October 2020 – 3rd May 2021

Haegue Yang – Installation view of The Great Acceleration,
Taipei Biennial 2014, Taiwan, 2014
Photo: Taipei Fine Arts Museum

Maria Balshaw, Director, Tate said: “I’m thrilled to be reopening our galleries and can’t wait to welcome visitors back. While you’ve been away, we have worked hard to ensure our spaces are safe and accessible for everybody. We have also extended many major exhibitions and commissions, all of which feel as powerful and relevant today as they did when they first opened.”

Additional safety measures require timed tickets to be purchased in advance (for paid and free exhibitions) and card or contactless payments to be used for any purchases inside the galleries. One way routes and hand sanitiser will be in place and visitors are recommended to wear a face covering (mandatory in shop sections which may be on your route so best to have one with you). Bear in mind that while toilets are open, cloakrooms and lockers are still closed. Full details, along with opening times and links to buy tickets are on their website – please check all information before visiting any of the sites and if you’re feeling unwell, please stay safe and stay home.

Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG

Tate Liverpool, Royal Albert Dock, Liverpool L3 4BB

Tate Modern, Bankside, London SE1 9TG

Tate St Ives, Porthmeor Beach, St Ives, Cornwall TR26 1TG

Tate Website (all galleries)

Words by Siobhan
Photos and details reproduced with permission from Tate – all images are copyrighted as detailed above

27th July 2020

Artist Spotlight with Jordain Molloy Gillen

Amidst the strange times of social isolation that we’re living through, we’re delighted to introduce you to the vibrant and unique world of multi-media artist Jordain Molloy Gillen. Here, he shares some of his work and the influences behind it…

‘Born and raised in Ballymena, Northern Ireland, Jordain Molloy Gillen is an artist and designer who has been practicing professionally for three years. Graduating in Fine Art from Belfast School of Art in 2017, having studied there for four years, Jordain has expanded his practice fantastically. To date Jordain has worked on a number of things outside of his practice including events dressing with Creating Retail Magic, having his own solo shows The Millinery Collection and Dark Glamour, collaborating with Lush Belfast for culture night and working in the costume department for productions such as Give My Head Peace and Game of Thrones.

From a young age Jordain was always surrounded by the arts. He was taught to draw and sculpt by his grandfather who was self taught and would create pieces of work as a hobby. His grandmother taught him how to sew and influenced his interest in fashion. Throughout his teenage years he would continuously create headpieces and make small garments for his mother’s dolls. He was always a very keen photographer as well and would never miss an opportunity for a photograph as he believed in capturing memories. More recently Jordain has taught himself how to create bespoke jewelry pieces including brooches and earrings. Jordain has also transferred his love for drawing and sketching into detailed illustrations depicting feelings, dreams and memories. As well as this Jordain now creates more elaborate garments and is currently expanding his work as a designer along with being an artist.

There really are no limitations to his practice for he believes that an artist should not be restricted to their abilities. Identifying as a Queer artist and designer, he believes in spiritual growth and experimenting with your art, for art is to be enjoyed not only by others but by the artist too. Jordain is quite a humanitarian and believes in equality and making a statement, to give a voice to society. He is also very concerned with matters affecting the natural earth and animal rights which is conveyed in some aspects of his work. When creating work he has a dreamlike vision in which he likes to work with processes that incorporate colour, golden shine and illusionistic qualities, offering something you can only imagine from a dream or mythical experience.’

Silk Waistcoat with Custom Hanger
Waistcoat made purely from silk paint skins with metal hanger made from steel, 2016 – This piece was experimental in which I wanted to play on the idealism of creating a garment with ‘silk’ from silk paint.

Untitled
Headpiece made from silk paint skins, photographed by me also, 2016 – 
Again this piece was experimental to create a non-binary idenitity with fashion.

Left: Hangman – Headdress
Masquerade made from chiffon, steel metal and embellishments, photographed by Michael Brad, 2017 – 
This piece depicts a character disguised from society, seen as unapproachable but trying to see beyond the veil only to be blinded by love.

Right: Into the Forest
Mirror Sculpture and Horn headpiece
, photographed by Michael Brad, 2017 – This piece is very much a fairytale piece to tell a story of how a mirror holds reflections within. The actual mirror within this sculpture belonged to my granda who had passed away at the time. It was his shaving mirror and so the idea behind this piece was that the mirror holds reflections of times past.

Gothic Masquerade
Masquerade made from machie and embellishments
, photographed by Megan Sanderson from Imprint Photography, 2018 – This piece was featured as part of Dark Glamour, using Venitian mask making techniques and exploring the gothic.

The Love of The Sun & The Moon
A4 Acrylic painting, 2019 – 
I have always had a fascination with the love story of the sun and the moon and so I have explored this throughout various pieces of my work.

Left: The Moon and the Stars in the Palm of my Hand
A4 Acrylic painting, 2019 – 
This piece depicts the imagery of having all the abilities to pursue your dreams with power you hold in your hands.

Right: Luna in Virgo
A4 Acrylic painting, 2019 – 
Continuing with the theme of astrology this piece is a homage to my mother who is a Virgo star sign.

Becoming the Storm
A4 Acrylic painting, 2019 – 
This piece was inspired by a look from The Vivienne from RuPaul’s Drag Race. The concept behind it was to tell the story of how depression can cover someone’s head like a cloud from a storm and to raise awareness for mental health. This piece was very touching for me as it conveyed some of my own personal feelings.

Left: Tropical Headpiece
Mixed media, 2019 – 
This piece was created purely for fun as an alternative to your everyday fascinators, created with a tropical twist.

Right: Sketch for Goddess Headdress – This is my initial first sketch for my Goddess headdress.

Left: Spring Awakening
Collaboration featuring my neckpiece and Goddess headdress
, photographed by Megan Sanderson from Imprint Photography, edited by Jordain Molloy Gillen, 2020 – This piece is very much about telling a story of new beginnings.

Right: Untitled
Collaboration with Megan Sanderson, featuring me wearing my red star cloak made from recycled fabric from old garments, my Goddess headdress and neck piece, photographed by Megan Sandedrson from Imprint Photography, edited by Jordain Molloy Gillen.

Luna Moon
A3 Screen print, 2020 – 
This piece again explores the story of the sun and the moon. Here the sun is resting while the moon comforts and smiles. This was also screen printed onto T-shirts.

Bat Brooches
Made from leatherette, felt and embellishments, 2020 – 
These were first made with wool felt recycled from an old trilby. Due to popularity I then made a second bunch from leatherette. A little gothic twist with colour.

‘To see something that others can’t see is unique, but to be able to capture the moment and share it for others to enjoy the secrecy of happiness is something greater than we can imagine.’
– Jordain Molloy Gillen

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All content in this feature is created and copyrighted by Jordain, excepting where other photographers and collaborators are noted. You can explore more of Jordain’s work on his website and follow his progress on Instagram and Facebook.

You can also see more from the other photographers credited:
Michael Brad – Instagram
Megan Sanderson (Imprint Photography NI) – Instagram

23rd March 2020

 

 

Exhibition – Get Up, Stand Up Now (Somerset House)

Exhibition – Somerset House, London, 12th June – 15th September 2019
Get Up, Stand Up Now – Generations of Black Creative Pioneers 

(Header shot: Fashion Shoot Brixton Market 1973 © Armet Francis)

Last week saw some inspiring new installations arrive within the Neoclassical walls of London’s Somerset House; Get Up, Stand Up Now is a collection that not only forms an important documentation of black creatives in Britain but also provides a vibrant treat for your eyes and ears.

Introduction from press release:

‘This summer, Somerset House celebrates the impact of 50 years of black creativity in Britain and beyond, with a landmark exhibition showcasing art, film, photography, music, literature, design and fashion. It is the first time that this distinguished group of approximately 100 artists are represented together, with their work articulating and addressing the black experience and sensibility, from the post-war era to the present day.

Historic artworks and new commissions sit alongside items from personal archives, much of which has never been seen by the public before. Through these original photographs, letters, films and audio clips, the exhibition connects the creative, the personal and the political, reflecting how artists have responded to the issues of our times.’

From the series ‘We are the Same’ © Campbell Addy

Get Up, Stand Up Now is curated by visual artist Zak Ové and begins close to home with work by his father, Trinidad born Horace Ové, who is widely credited as being the first black British feature film director (Pressure, 1975). Along with a group of his Windrush generation peers, Horace broke down barriers that encouraged younger multicultural artists to develop their own creativity and voices. Screenings of a selection of his films will form part of the exhibition. Amongst his contemporaries also exhibited are social documentary photographers Armet Francis, Charlie Phillips and Vanley Burke, often referred to as ‘the Godfather of black British photography’.

Still from Neneh Cherry, Kong 2018 © Jenn Nkiru

Elsewhere in the exhibition you can find exquisite stills and film from visionary artist and director Jenn Nkiru and stunning shots from high fashion photographer and film-maker Campbell Addy, photographer and visual activist Ajamu and Benji Reid, who describes his work as ‘choreo-photolist’, where theatricality, choreography and photography meet in a single or series of images. The exhibits individually are head-turning; in their entirety they form a fascinating collection of artistry covering the last 5 decades.

From Circus Master Series 1997 © Ajamu

Musical creativity also plays an integral part in the exhibition, with an exclusive soundtrack mixed by producer DJ Jillionaire streaming inside the gallery, a display of instruments and objects selected by musicians and live percussive performances on scheduled dates. And fashion is high on the agenda too, with a varied selection of sculptural exhibits including an Afro-futuristic cowboy from luminary designer Mowalola Ogunlesi.

Holding onto Daddy © Benji Reid 2016

All in all, Get Up, Stand Up Now offers an immersive experience covering all aspects of the arts. Given the obvious display of talent, it raises the question beautifully of why there isn’t more diversity on show at mainstream exhibitions across the country.

For anyone able to visit this coming weekend (22nd – 23rd June), there are some additional special celebrations taking place to mark National Windrush Day with Generation Get Up!

A host of free interactive events will encompass exclusive film screenings and talks (including a Q&A with actor, director and writer Kwame Kwei-Armah) and pop up studio Backgrounds offering the option to have a free professional portrait taken and share stories of identity and heritage, creating a new collective portrait of Britain today. There will also be an enticing selection of African and Caribbean street food stalls to tempt you before or after your visit.

Top left: Ishmahol Blagrove’s Free Speech Now
Top right: Yinka Shonibare’s Self Portrait (after Warhol)
Bottom: Yinka Shonibare’s Revolution Kid (Calf) and Sanford Biggers’ Woke
All 3 installation shots © Peter Macdiarmid

Get Up, Stand Up Now runs from 12th June – 15th September 2019

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA
Opening times: Mon – Tues and Sat – Sun 10 – 6, Wed – Fri 11 – 8 – please check the website for variable admission prices and further details of this and other exhibitions before visiting

All images and exhibition details are reproduced with permission from Somerset House and are copyrighted as credited

Words (excluding press release extract) by Siobhan

19th June 2019

 

 

 

Exhibition – Joy for Ever (The Whitworth)

Exhibition – The Whitworth, Manchester, 29th March – 9th June 2019
Joy for Ever: how to use art to change the world and its price in the market

A new exhibition opening its doors on Friday takes a look at the life, work and impact of artist and social reformer John Ruskin. The parallels between his quest for equality in the 1800s and current concerns around discrimination and accessibility in today’s society can’t fail to strike a chord. The content includes a huge variety of subject matter and artistic technique, all set in The Whitworth’s beautiful building and surroundings.

John Ruskin and Manchester – a synopsis:

Born into a prosperous home in 1819, John Ruskin travelled extensively around Europe with his parents, developing a keen interest in art and architecture. Over time, he became troubled by the comparison between some of the beautiful places he visited and what he considered to be a grimy capitalist environment on his return. In adulthood he became a famed art critic then began to speak out as a lecturer, berating property developers for prioritising profit over the wellbeing of their communities, industrialists for not treating their workers properly and the Victorian bourgeoisie as a whole for neglecting the welfare of the poor. In 1857 Ruskin voiced a particularly scathing attack on the city of Manchester in response to The Great Art Treasures exhibition, a huge collection of artworks amassed from wealthy private owners, epitomising everything he found unjust and unbalanced. His views were not appreciated by the conservative magazine and publisher he wrote for and led to his essays being pulled from publication; he proceeded to publish them instead in his seminal book Unto This Last. He went on to set up The Guild of St George (originally St George’s Company and still a charity today) to pursue his vision of a better society where communities would live more happily working within a network of rural, sustainable farms and be given access to education and museums. Quite what he would make of today’s society where the vulnerable have their benefits withdrawn and food banks are a growing trend is something to ponder. There is no little irony in the fact that the exhibition opens on the day that was due to see the dawning of Brexit but instead finds us amidst a political meltdown of enormous proportions. 

Facade of The Doge’s Palace, Venice – The Vine Angle, 1907.5, John Ruskin © Manchester Art Gallery / Bridgeman Images

Exhibition details:

‘In the 200th anniversary of his birth, The Whitworth responds to the artist, art critic, teacher and social reformer John Ruskin – in a year when his words seem as relevant now as they did then, in a climate of perceived ecological, political and social catastrophe. Ruskin was complex, difficult and flawed, as well as profound. He also hated Manchester, and therefore it seems fitting that the city responds with equal complexity and irreverence.

Joy for Ever combines The Whitworth’s renowned collection of art and design with archival documents, contemporary installations, a cast of the wall of Westminster Hall, a road building, textiles, politics, pictures, a protest on the EBacc by local school children and commissions from Manchester based design studio Standard Practice and Grizedale Arts from the Lake District.

Peter Hodgson and Laure Prouvost, Tile Panel, 2016, Photo by Adam Sutherland

In the first gallery, the displays respond to Ruskin’s question: how can an art collection be used for wider social advantage? Here some of the Whitworth’s collections are curated by the gallery’s Handmade group, who meet regularly as part of a city-wide campaign to develop Manchester as an age-friendly city, alongside Year 9 pupils from Hyndburn Academy in Blackburn in protest against the introduction of the EBacc that devalues arts education in schools.

The next gallery focuses on the relationship between art, architecture and ideas of good governance, speaking of how Gothic style was appropriated in the 19th century and became the architecture of state and commercial power. Ruskin admired the city of Venice as a model society, in which its Gothic buildings were created by the mutual cooperation of architect and craftsman, forming much of his thinking on the relationship between labour and happiness. Depictions of Gothic architecture by Ruskin’s favourite artists JMW Turner and Samuel Prout from The Whitworth’s collection will be displayed.

Jorge Otero-Pailos’ Ethics of Dust, a large-scale latex cast directly from the wall surface of Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the Houses of Parliament, will be displayed alongside wallpaper designs by Augustus Pugin and Alfred Waterhouse’s designs of Manchester’s neo-Gothic Town Hall.

Both images above: Jorge Otero-Pailos – The Ethics of Dust, Westminster Hall, London, 2016. Commissioned and produced by Artangel, Photos by Marcus J Leith

A new moving image work by Greek artist, Aikaterini Gegisian is included. This draws from the archives of the US Library of Congress and explores the breakdown of the European Union manifested in both the Greek debt crisis and Brexit.

Picture above & header picture: Third Person (Plural): Episode 1: Centrifuge, 2018-19 film stills courtesy of Aikaterini Gegisian

The final gallery explores art’s role in education and social design. Ruskin believed that drawing from nature helps shape our understanding of citizenship. He had a huge teaching collection, often making and commissioning copies of paintings and drawings of natural specimens as tools for instruction. Here a selection of drawings from Manchester’s collections alongside an original lecture diagram, plaster casts of leaves and models of feathers borrowed from The Ruskin Museum are presented. Manchester design studio Standard Practice has been commissioned to make a series of drawing lecterns for visitors to make drawings inspired by the collections on display.

Grizedale Arts marks its 10 year anniversary of projects in Coniston, the town where Ruskin lived for the last 28 years of his life and where he implemented many of his social experiments on craft, farming, water supply, dairy producing etc. This exhibition will present a mini survey of around 100 projects they’ve created to date, such as the Honest Shop, mini library and exhibitions of local crafts with a series of connected making workshops and talks.’

Joy for Ever: how to use art to change the world and its price in the market runs from 29th March – 9th June 2019 – free entry

The Whitworth, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M15 6ER
Opening times: Monday – Wednesday 9-5, Thursday 9-9, Friday – Saturday 9-5, Sunday 10-5 – please check the website for further details of this and other exhibitions before visiting

All images and exhibition details are reproduced with permission from The Whitworth and are copyrighted/owned as credited

Words for introduction and synopsis by Siobhan

27th March 2019

V&A Dundee

The Victoria and Albert in London is one of the largest design museums in the world as well as being one of the longest established, founded way back in 1852.

Its new family member, V&A Dundee, is a baby in comparison, a project almost 10 years in the making, opened to the public in September 2018. Designed by award-winning Japanese architect Kengo Kuma (also charged with designing the Olympic Stadium for Tokyo 2020), the striking building in made up of curved concrete walls supporting 2,500 rough stone panels, set to replicate a Scottish cliff-face and resembling the shape of a ship. Sitting on the waterfront with the River Tay as its backdrop, it somehow manages to blend in and stand out all at once.

V&A Dundee houses examples of Scottish design from fashion to furniture; music fans will appreciate the inclusion of record sleeves designed by Glasgow’s David Band for Aztec Camera and Altered Images. For fans of another famous Glaswegian, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the Oak Room has been painstakingly reconstructed as it would have been seen originally in Miss Cranston’s Ingram Street Tearooms in the early 1900s.

Additionally, temporary exhibitions, events and activities will run throughout the year and there is a cafe, restauarant and a range of suitably aesthetically pleasing items available in the gift shop all on site. It will be interesting to see how the museum develops and hopefully brings new business and tourism alike to the area and its community.

V&A Dundee, Riverside Esplanade DD1 4EZ

Free entry, some exhibitions have an entrance fee

Opening times: Monday – Sunday 10-5 – please check the website for further details and prices of current exhibitions before visiting

Words and photos by Siobhan

4th January 2019