Gallery – Festivals

“Here’s to the nights that turned into mornings, and the friends that turned into family” – Anon

A full year of festivals was just what the doctor ordered. While there will be no shortage of autumn/winter events still to come, now that the big summer dates are over we thought we’d take a look at some of your favourite festival shots and relive some of those happy moments…

Header photo by Stephen Flynn; details in article

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Sunset Memories at Indietracks

Splendour Festival

By Nigel King Photography – Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

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Nile Rodgers at Belladrum Tartan Heart

Chris ‘Kingfisher’ Ingram at Belladrum Tartan Heart

By Alan Cruickshank – Flickr

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Kamikaze Millionaires at Glastonselfy – this event is held every year in memory of a young woman who died due to cancer, held in Crosskeys rugby field in Gwent

The Commitments taking in Ollifest in Ross on Wye

By Delwyn Edwards Photography – Website | Instagram

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‘And the award for biggest crowd of the day goes to…’
Buzzcocks, 10,000 people, R-Fest, Blackpool

Buzzcocks, backstage at R-Fest

By Steve White – Instagram | Twitter

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Dylan at Latitude Festival

Priestgate at Latitude Festival

By Andy Gardener – Instagram | Twitter

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London Grammar at South Facing Festival

By Joshua Russell – Instagram

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Archy & the Astronauts at Call of the Wild Festival

Badness at Whitwell Festival of Music

By Tina Sherwood at All The Ts Photography – Instagram

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HENGE at Fusion Festival, Germany

By Ingrid Turner – Website | Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

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Spector at 110 Above Festival

The Pigeon Detectives at Camper Calling

By Phil Drury at 2324 Photography – Website | Instagram

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Tatiana Shmailyuk at Bloodstock

Dimmu Borgir at Bloodstock

By Clare Ratcliffe – Instagram | Facebook

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Kelly Jones of Stereophonics at Victorious Festival

Tim Booth of James, crowd-surfing at Victorious Festival

By Stephen Flynn at Live Music Snaps – Instagram

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I’m Tired Now – Self Esteem at Victorious Festival

In the Moment – All Points East

By Siobhan at 16 Beasley St Photography – Website | Instagram | Twitter

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Thank you to all the photographers who have contributed to the gallery, and to everyone involved in the festival industry – it’s great to have you back. You can check out more from those featured on the links shown above.

All pictures are copyrighted by the photographer credited; please do not use without gaining their permission first.

28th September 2022

 

All Points East Festival 2022

All Points East Festival, London, 28th August 2022

With a propensity for pulling in the biggest names, All Points East returned this year with another impressive run of weekend events that included headline slots from Disclosure, The National, Tame Impala, Gorillaz and culminating last Sunday with Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds.

Cave’s last performance at APE in 2019 is still revered and doubtless this one will be talked about for a long time too. A captivating showman with a setlist spanning the career of The Bad Seeds, the two hours plus on stage was once again a showcase of how to hold a crowd in the palm of your red right hand.

Still, there were plenty of reasons to be there earlier in the day too with some excellent main stage sets from Chilli Jesson and Kae Tempest amongst others. Jesson seems to be more accomplished with each performance, and Tempest could easily have been much higher up the line-up and without doubt captured some new fans.

Over at the BMW #PlayNext stage, lots of new talent throughout the day with exciting sets from Attawalpa, Bonnie Kemplay and fast rising stars The Dinner Party.

The North stage played host to some great music with light shows to match from the likes of Jehnny Beth, Spiritualized and Sleaford Mods, while the Ray-Ban West stage had the pleasure of Michael Kiwanuka’s presence, always a flawless production.

An eclectic mix and an open opportunity to see some firmly established acts while discovering new breakthrough artists just around the corner. Looking forward to seeing who APE manage to sign up in 2023.

Words and photos by Siobhan

7th September 2022

Victorious Festival 2022

Victorious Festival, 26th-28th August 2022, Southsea Common

Long established as a local festival, Victorious has grown over the years and now attract tens of thousands of people from near and far across the late summer bank holiday weekend. Family friendly and with some huge names performing, there’s a wide variety of music and activities running over the three days and, at the risk of throwing in a well versed cliche, there really is something for everyone.

Previously a two day event, the Friday opener is now well established and this year kicked off with Primal Scream playing in the hot, hot sunshine. From Bobby Gillespie’s Screamadelica inspired suit, to the gospel voices joining the stage, to the entire crowd singing along to Come Together, this was the perfect start to the weekend and a beautiful reminder of the power of live music.

Another standout on the main stage was (unsurprisingly) Self Esteem. Victorious has been criticised in the past for a lack of female artists on its line-up. It was really good to see a significant turnaround on this, as the rows of teenage girls loving every second of this set will attest – would be great to see a switch-up in the daily headliners too next year – 2022 offered up Stereophonics on Friday, Paolo Nutini on Saturday and Sam Fender on Sunday. Other big names across the weekend included James, Anna Calvi, Bastille, Sports Team, Anne Marie and Suede.

There was also plenty going on at the selection of smaller stages with some great showcases from loads of local favourites – amongst others Jerry Williams, Marley Blandford, Flowvers, Welly and the inimitable Van Gosh, who never disappoint visually but don’t be lulled into thinking they’re just a gimmick band; they can really play. Lots more to see and discover across the common too with a kids’ area, comedy tent, skatepark and an impressive choice of food and drink vendors and festival shops.

All in all, a really successful weekend with lots of memories made. If you want to join in the fun, tickets for 2023 are on sale now here. Check out our photo gallery below and see if you can find your favourite act (or even yourself) in there!

Common Stage

Primal Scream

Primal Scream, We Are Scientists

Self Esteem

Soak

James

Acoustic Stage

Paddy Taylor

Amba Tremain, Margo Cilker, Jerry Williams

Marley Blandford

Beats & Swing Stage

Utah Saints

Showcase Stage

Ben Brookes

Andy Foster

World Music Stage

Hutch

Welly

Castle Stage

Sports Team, Coach Party, Only The Poets

White Lies

Casemates Stage

Filta, Jordan Duke

Flowvers

Van Gosh

Words by Siobhan
Photos:
Acoustic Stage, Beats & Swing Stage, Showcase Stage and Casemates Stage by Hannah Mesquitta
Common Stage, World Music Stage and Castle Stage by Siobhan

2nd September 2022

Breaking Glass Magazine – September 2022

Breaking Glass Magazine – September 2022

We’ve hit September, autumn’s on its way and the last of the summer festivals are playing out into the sunset. Time for a photo gallery?

We’ve loved being back at events this summer and seeing all your fab festival images. So, if you’d like to have some of your favourites featured on the website we’re opening up submissions until 16th September. Images must be from a festival that’s taken place in 2022 but can be indoor or outdoor events, big or small, artist or crowd shots. The usual details apply, as below:

– Theme is ‘Festivals’
– Email images to breakingglassmag@gmail.com including festival name, location and month taken
– Max 2 photos per contributor
– Breaking Glass is not a profit-making publication; we can’t pay for contributions nor do we charge for entries as many sites do
– Copyright remains with the photographer; by submitting your photos you grant us permission to include them in the stated gallery and to promote this and related posts on the website and social media with credit
– Jpg files please – portrait / landscape / square are all fine
– You can send with or without watermark
– Please let us know how you’d like to be credited and include links to website/socials

Cover shot: Victorious Festival by Siobhan

1st September 2022

Brighton & Hove Pride – Parade & Portraits

Brighton & Hove Pride, 6th & 7th August 2022

After a two year gap, it was fantastic to see the return of Brighton & Hove Pride for its 30th anniversary outing. Undisputedly one of the biggest and brightest events on the local calendar, the theme for this years Pride celebration was LOVE · PROTEST · UNITY.

The Pride LGBTQ+ Community Parade was back too in all its glory, crowds of all ages lining the streets from Hove Lawns to Preston Park as the carnival rolled its way through town. A feast of colour and noise, local community groups, charities and businesses were out in force to show their support, with international representation firmly in the mix too.

Brighton & Hove Pride is operated by Brighton Pride CIC, a not for profit community organisation. All ticket revenue raised goes directly to the operational and running costs of producing the Pride Festival, Pride LGBTQ+ Community Parade, Pride Village Party and community fundraising. Over £936,000 has been raised for the Brighton Rainbow Fund, Pride Cultural Development Fund and Pride Social Impact Fund in the last seven years. The Brighton Rainbow Fund has a remit to receive donations and to use them to give grants to LGBT and HIV groups and organisations in Brighton & Hove. The Pride Social Impact Fund benefits good causes giving grants to a range of local groups.

Once the huge parade eventually reached its destination, the party continued in Preston Park with music, fairground rides, cabaret, dance and much more. The stages played host to Christina Aguilera, Paloma Faith, Jake Shears, Sophie Ellis-Bextor, Todrick Hall, Raye and Björn Again amongst others, and the atmosphere was as hot as the sun.

Huge thanks to all involved and to all the fabulous attendees who made this a very special event. Did we catch you on camera? Check out our gallery of Pride Portraits below…

Brighton & Hove Pride – more information here

Words and photos by Siobhan 

8th August 2022

Hammer & Tongs Festival 2022

LET THE MUSIC PLAY

Hammer & Tongs Festival, 9th July at Corporation Sheffield

Header shots – Left: Steal the City, Right: Hunted by Elephants 

The modern music scene is suffering; gigs frequently cancelled, stadium tickets prohibitively expensive and, if you need to travel, increased fuel costs and hotel bills, so don’t be afraid to take a risk and listen to new talent playing local to you, for it is surely out there!

Concrete Kingdoms

Check out the bands on Spotify/YouTube. Research their socials. The future of modern music is in everyone’s hands, so if people continue to just go for nostalgia, where will we be as the ‘old ones die off’ one by one?

Hammer & Tongs Festival was an all-day event at Sheffield’s iconic Corporation venue. It promised to be a bargain gig with TEN quality rock bands across the day for the incredible price of just £12 (You do the maths)! Unfortunately, with a couple of days to go, a couple of alterations to the bill were made due to Covid, but top local replacements meant expectations remained high.

There was something for every rock music enthusiast including exciting young talent such as Archy & the Astronauts, Unknown Refuge and Mad Haven which, for a 14+ venue, is a fantastic way to inspire young hopefuls.

Archy & the Astronauts 

Stepping-up to headline was Nottingham-based classic rock trio BlitZ who never fail to deliver that end-of-the-night party feel! Dipping into the breach came local boys, Steal the City, whose incredible energy leaves the venue on a high after every performance.

Steal the City

With equally outstanding performances from Circus 66, Concrete Kingdoms, King Voodoo and Hunted By Elephants, Hammer & Tongs Festival must have been the best value Saturday rock show anywhere! Everyone attending was of the same mind: Hammer & Tongs Festival was a fantastic occasion.

Left: Unknown Refuge, Right: King Voodoo 

The message is loud & clear: don’t be afraid to try something new. They say the music goes on forever; but if we don’t support its growth, as Don McLean predicted, that’ll be The Day The Music Dies.

All bands mentioned in this article can be found on the usual online music platforms. Why not choose one and check them out? It may just brighten your life!

Words and photos by Tina Sherwood at All The Ts Photography 

18th July 2022

2000 Trees Festival 2022

2000 Trees Festival, Cheltenham, 7th – 10th July 2022

After a difficult couple of years for everyone in the festival business, it was an absolute joy to be back at 2000 Trees at the weekend. Ask anyone who’s been and you’ll always hear about the brilliant atmosphere – year on year Trees is one of the friendliest festivals you’ll find; a treasure trove in the heart of the Cotswolds with all the stages only a few minutes walk from each other.

And if you want to see just how easy it is to put on a line-up that’s full of diversity and talent, look no further. Here are some highlights from Saturday…

I swear the sun always shines on 2000 Trees and this year was no exception. It was HOT at the main stage, but easier to handle as the rest of the stages are under cover. No let up in energy though despite the heat as Dream Nails had the crowd bouncing along to their lunchtime set.

Taking shade in The Axiom, Hotel Lux brought their well-versed line of deadpan narrative to the table, complete with strings and a choice selection of hats. Always a good line-up addition (the band and the hats).

Back in the sunshine, Mannequin Pussy treated the crowd to a kinetic performance, their recent UK dates clearly bringing new fans to the party.

Second trip to The Axiom for Kid Kapichi – it’s always hard to judge how a band fairly local to you are viewed outside of that space, but there could be no doubting that this is not a phenomenon specific to the south coast any longer. A packed tent and one of the biggest singalongs of the day showed just how much support the band have on a much wider scale.

To the Neu Stage next, for all the punk-filled fun that comes with Gen and the Degenerates. An explosive performance with plenty of time for audience interaction between a fine set of tunes. A great fit for the Trees’ ethic.

Another outfit on point for this fantastic festival came in the shape of Nova Twins. Filling the main stage with ease, their energy is infectious and it would be no surprise to see them climbing higher and higher up future line-ups.

Filling up the space at the Neu stage again, you know an artist is going to be well received when they’re getting huge cheers for their soundcheck – deservedly so for Lauran Hibberd (and the actual set was on point too).

Headliners over the week included Jimmy Eat World, Thrice and IDLES, and lots of other big names and regulars featured too. So, a fabulous array of acts to see, a new Forest stage for those quieter moments, and the usual warm welcome from both the event and the weather – 2000 Trees is without a doubt one of the things I’ve missed most. See you next year.

Tickets for 2000 Trees 2023 available here

Words and photos by Siobhan

11th July 2022

Preview – Victorious Festival

Victorious Festival, Southsea Seafront, 26th-28th August 2022

After a barrage of bank holidays we find ourselves in a bit of a lull – so prepare to be shaken awake by the next one as Victorious returns to Southsea at the end of August!

There are many festivals in amazing settings and this one is definitely up there in the location stakes as Southsea Common becomes its own festival village, flanked by the castle onsite and the sea just the other side of the wall. Continuing to grow and attract top level artists over the years, Victorious has something for everyone, whatever age.

This year’s headline spots are taken by Stereophonics, Paolo Nutini and straight from wowing the crowds at Glastonbury, Sam Fender. Other big names across the weekend include James, Self Esteem, White Lies and Suede, all worthy of a headline slot themselves. For those of you more interested in what’s happening further along the line-up, the eclectic mix of Anna Calvi, Soak, Sports Team, Coach Party, Little Boots, Dylan John Thomas, Honeyglaze and many, many more. There are also loads of family friendly activities in the Kids’ Arena, with a beach area, arts and crafts and the chance to learn some circus skills.

It promises to be a great weekend and if you can’t make all three days, there are options for single day tickets too. Remaining tickets available here.

Words by Siobhan

28th June 2022

 

Dot to Dot Festival (Bristol) 2022

Dot to Dot Festival, Bristol, 28th May 2022 / Nottingham, 29th May 2022

While competing with the likes of Wide Awake and Bearded Theory this weekend, Dot to Dot proved itself worthy of both its status and name by creating a landscape of music over two cities in two days. Catching the event in Bristol on the 28th, I was treated with a great sweep of music, emblematic both of the talent of those involved in creating events like this, as well as of the bright world of local music. Throughout, band and audience joined, each enticed by other bands, hen nights, buskers and all the delights that the city had to offer on the sunniest day of the month.  

The day started off at the lovely Louisiana’s bar with Hamburger. The Bristol locals have a musical collection which (personally) can only be described as having the energy of the ending of a coming of age teen film. Their performance, which enticingly involved three guitars with no bass (creating a lush style of light sadness), was backed by a wonderful collective atmosphere, with each member of the front of the band singing along. The lead singer, Fearghall, shines through with falsetto style ‘emo’ singing, fitting well within the upbeat tracks the band had to show. ‘Supersad’ was a key highlight, reflecting the band’s talents for emanating fun sounds between reflections of misery. With a scream from keyboardist Katie, the day was set with a fun energy. 

Once their time came, it was a short walk to the Dockside for Sam Akpro. After seeing the band open for Connie Constance back in September, their style of melancholic rock found a whole new light, quite literally, within the summery setting given to them. Assuming their tracks would be misplaced out of the dark room I’d first caught them, the band instead caught me offguard, providing a new fun and joy alongside their atmospheric moods. Alongside the weaving personality of the titular singer, both guitarists on each side of Sam brought an integral aspect to the band: the lead guitarist with sparking blood, biting his guitar strings any chance he could, and the bassist with some beautifully clean riffs, keeping subdued but integral. If you’re into Krule-ish styles, or just good music, ‘Juno’ acts as a nice introduction into this world.

With a good 15 minute break we were given time to head into the Academy, where DAMEFRISØR kicked off with their stylish musings. The collective, made of 6, are perfectly able to craft a distinct level of mood, enveloping the audience in a pool of sound, sprinkled with techno fusions, like in the closer 2-HEH-V, beginning with a glitchy monologue alongside a beautifully simple arpeggio, before expanding into a blazing fury. It was a shame, given the time constraints, that they weren’t allowed to play for longer – a full Dame set would surely be special.

Clearly, whoever was working on the setlist was a mastermind, because this mood was regained almost immediately by the seminal Just Mustard. With their album Heart Under released just the day before, their style was ready to be injected into the academy. As they went on each track gained more traction, especially energised in Mirrors, which closed off the first half of their setlist, symbolised by the surprise reveal of a bow for one guitarist to make even more of a disturbingly long groan, a key staple of Heart Under.  From both near and far, their signature sound was sure to find its way inside each audience member, with all its beautiful grime. 

Next, it was a megawalk to The Fleece, to catch Coach Party. Arriving around 5 to 10 minutes before its start, it was a surprise to see the room already packed, brimming with fans. It wasn’t hard to see why: the Party themselves have an infectiously fun energy pervading through their songs. Even watching from a distance, their atmosphere carried through the crowd, elevating their bouncy rock thanks to both the audience and the band’s own energy – seen most effectively in the second scream of the day, from guitarist Steph Norris. Each track felt as vibrant from the next: even the more talkative, bleaker ‘Shit TV’ has ended up replaying most in my mind days after their set. 

A well earned break accidentally led to a disastrous time mismanage, where in trying to find any way to choose between BG favourites Honeyglaze and techno-duo Jockstrap, time chose to take both away. To make this situation worse, a mishap at doors led to the departure of the camera into the cloakroom for (almost) the rest of the night. Tragedy seemed set. The dots of dot to dot were forming an outline of disaster. 

So what better time for some nice indie-pop?

Make Friends were the next unplanned surprise of the night. After it taking us half the set to realise this wasn’t Gretel Hänlyn (which in hindsight should’ve been more obvious from the all-male band), we found the dig which allowed the grooves of the Bristol locals to set in. It was hard to find a more delightful sight, between their breezy tunes and the delighted dancing of some of the older fans. Placed elegantly before Cassia, the band’s atmosphere holds a similar summery quality, while keeping fresh with passionate lead singer and elegant percussion. With hits like ‘Hesitate’, the mistakes of the past were left behind, and our minds were set towards the future. 

The future came immediately, with Cassia fronting just five minutes after in the room beside. Sitting down, it was a matter of spotting any member we could through the legs of audience members, as well as feeling the rhythms of the bass through seats. Even a false start couldn’t stop the atmosphere from feeling soft, comforting. If it wasn’t for the other bands that night, I could’ve happily slept to the dreaminess of their sound, exemplified by hits like ‘Drifting’. Sadly cut short, the atmosphere Cassia created couldn’t be left behind.

The summer sun transferred from sound to sight with a return to the dockside for Bleach Lab. In risk of running that sun metaphor too long, the Lab’s signature tranquility turned it purple, into a Violet Light of sorts. The quality of the band, especially in singer Jenna Kyle’s delivery, was truly put into its space here, with recent and (hopefully) soon to be released tracks making the most of the summer atmosphere. 

Heading back to the Louisiana, it was a delight to chat briefly to George O’Hanlon, who had been a last minute replacement to the set. He gave some integral behind the scenes information, especially concerning a hot dog mixup with another George from festival mindblowers FEET. It was clear that Lime Garden was the place to be, and it only became more clear once their set began. In a full room, the quartet were electrifying, both in and between songs. Each track transformed on stage: ‘Marbles’ became even more funky that it already is, ‘Clockwork’ gained an extra groove – they even gave ‘Sick and Tired’ a new light once feeding me the actual lyrics, as opposed to the usual ramble I’d sing in the post-chorus. It’s hard not to see this as the highlight of the day – even with a 30 minute set, the band showed their place as a force of pure excitement, hopefully making their way up to the bigger stages soon enough. 

As much as this praise could seem to dislodge headliners Squid from their place, the night couldn’t have wrapped up any other way. Now, with camera back in hand, the night was set to end in burning intensity. Intensity was certainly there. ‘Sludge’ kicked off the team’s repertoire, a track whose title speaks for itself, wading through stellar lines and bass riffs. Two (assumedly) new tracks set the tone for what the band sounded like to those who hadn’t heard them before – good noise, essentially. 

Houseplants provided the second best joke of the night, with the song’s rise and fall of tempo acting like the friend who won’t stop starting the car as you put your hand on the door. The best, of course, had to go to the fan who decided to go shirtless-on-shoulders to ‘Documentary Filmmaker’ – the most subdued of the band’s setlist. Whoever he was, he brought the joy of the room together, and I can’t thank him enough for it. Singer/drummer Ollie Judge’s constant references to the Superbock logo were certaintly up there, too – I think at one point, the only word stated in a song interval was ‘Superbock’. 

Waning between their rage and atmosphere (halved pretty perfectly in ‘Boy Racers’), the headliners allowed for breathing room between the high octane numbers of the night. The mosh was a place of both fuel and love – a delightful mix of characters to end a delightful day. Someone may even have been married within that night, according to the wedding dress caught on camera.

All in all, it should’ve been expected that those in Dot to Dot would deliver yet again, both in the artists actually performing to the audience and the audience itself. Each provided their own slice of the D2D pie: conversations with drunk guys who’d lost their mates; buskers providing backing for the walk to and from venues; the sun itself; all were in place to make it yet another day to remember, even if impossible to recall for some of the more excited members of the audience. 

Dot to Dot Festival

Words and photos by Jacob Rose

2nd June 2022

Call of the Wild Festival 2022

Summoned by Wolves : The Return of the Rock Festival

Call of the Wild Festival, Lincolnshire Showground, 19th – 22nd May 2022

Header shot: These Wicked Rivers

The Call Of The Wild sounded loud and clear, beckoning the faithful from across the land for only the second time.

Just days before the festival was due to open in 2021, the government once again altered their restrictions and, despite everyone’s best efforts, the festival was cancelled. This year, the organisers were poised and ready to go with vengeance and passion!

With 4 days of outstanding rock/punk/metal music, offering variation enough to delight festival goers of any age, an incredible 70+ bands delighted the crowd between Thursday afternoon and late Sunday evening in (almost) perfect festival weather.

Top: The Howling Tides
Bottom: Raging Speedhorn

Lincolnshire Showground provides a top backdrop for a music festival with camping availability, shower/toilet blocks and a perfect performance arena with access for all. A compact site, offering parallel stages, traditional music festival market stalls, merch tent, a well-considered selection of food vendors catering for any pallet and a third (smaller) stage serving fantastic coffees for the duration of the weekend meant that everything was to hand.

The roll call for this year’s Call Of The Wild Festival featured immense talent including a number of incredible bands from The States and Scandinavia. A quality line-up attractive enough to have a huge draw for festival goers who have missed out on so much for the past couple of years, desperate for the return of live music. Major weekend headliners, ex-Motorhead’s Phil Campbell and the Bastard Sons, Reckless Love, Massive Wagons and The Treatment did not disappoint delivering loud, wild, exciting sets, absolutely right for the end of the night!

Dallas & Drizzle – The L.A.Maybe

Personal highlights included Thin Lizzy/Black Star Riders’ favourite, Ricky Warwick and the Fighting Hearts, who rocked even the hardest souls of the few who had reluctantly ‘come along with the other half,’ and breathtaking Bournemouth-based hard rockers, South Of Salem, who brought the ‘Slipknot’ vibe and gave a show (complete with pyrotechnics) ensuring their right to be much further up on festival posters in the 12 months ahead.

Call Of The Wild is still a ‘young ‘un’ on the live music scene, but this year it’s pulled on its big pants and is now steaming ahead to knock more established events sideways.

For an unforgettable festival, check out Call Of The Wild on all social media platforms to see what you missed and to discover how to get on it for next time. You won’t regret it!

Tickets are already on sale for next year’s festival, with VIP packages almost sold out: Call Of The Wild: Lincolnshire Showground, 26th – 28th May 2023

Words and photos by Tina Sherwood at All The Ts Photography

30th May 2022

 

Live + Interview – South of Salem

Definitely not Massachusetts

Live from Call Of The Wild Festival, 2022

South Of Salem. Mean anything? Not a direction to an American town, but an incredible new band from beside the English seaside!

Hailing from Bournemouth, South of Salem have made it up to the Lincolnshire Showground for Call Of The Wild Festival, 2022 and last night produced what frontman, Joey Draper, called ‘one of the best gigs (he’s) ever played.’ Anyone in the audience would find it hard not to agree that their set was a ‘standout’ memory of the festival’s first day.

I was lucky enough to catch up with Joey and his wife, Lolly, the morning after the night before, to find out a little more about the SOS ‘phenomenon.’

Conceived just a month before Lockdown 1, it’s astonishing to realise that this band is holding its own alongside bands of much greater experience within the New Wave Of Classic Rock genre.

Belying everything his stage persona would lead you to believe, Joey Draper is shy, unassuming and well spoken. When he talks, his whole being is embroiled with the passion he feels for what he and his band of amazing creatives are doing.

He has a vision, clear and entirely realistic in terms of the speed with which South Of Salem have rocketed onto the scene during unprecedented times. The Voice of Conscience rings loud and clear through the lyrics, addressing contemporary issues such as male suicide, sadly something which has impacted on the band with their friends over the last year and a half.

With Gothic-style dolly dancers, (one of whom is Joey’s wife, Lolly), pyrotechnics, creative lighting and boundless energy, the front row members continuously leap atop strategically placed risers, allowing everyone to enjoy the limelight.

I’m not a betting person, but I’m prepared to lay long odds that the Big NameRock Festivals will be after these guys for their shows next year.

Get ahead of the crowd and discover them for yourselves now.

South Of Salem really do ROCK!

South of Salem

Words and photos by Tina Sherwood at All The Ts Photography

27th May 2022

Live + Interview – Massive Wagons

Massive Wagons – Interview with Tina Sherwood 

Hey, Massive Wagons!

Live from Call Of The Wild Festival, 2022

When offered the chance to chat to the fellas from MW, it was an opportunity not to be missed.

So when my turn came to meet with frontman, Barry ‘Baz’ Mills & Adam (one of the two Thislethwaite brothers in the band), I wanted to open with something a little different:

In the band, who has the most massive wagons?’ leaving it intentionally ambiguous to allow the conversation to take its natural course.

Needless to say, it did set the tone for the remainder of the interview and I never really did discover the answer; amusingly, I was rather wary of where to point the camera during their live headline performance in the evening though!

Amenable to the last, the guys chatted about the UK and European dates coming up this year. Travelling through Germany, Finland, Switzerland, the Massive Wagons experience will be rolling across Europe bringing the band’s particular brand of showmanship and sound to new and established audiences alike.

For the Wagons themselves, they see GrasPop Metal Meeting 2022 in Belgium as a particular milestone on their extraordinary journey, taking the stage alongside some of the greatest bands of our time, this year including Iron Maiden, Volbeat, Deep Purple, Judas Priest, Alice Cooper … and Massive Wagons. A dream line-up.

Massive Wagons are well and truly on a roll. I wish them all the luck in the world.

Go show ‘em, guys!

Massive Wagons

Interview and photos by Tina Sherwood at All The Ts Photography

23rd May 2022

Preview – Dot to Dot Festival

Dot to Dot Festival, Bristol 28th May / Nottingham 29th May 2022

Perhaps in response to our wonderful range of weather, something the UK does really well is an urban festival. Having been around since 2005, Dot to Dot Festival is no stranger to the platform, and is set to present another sterling line-up of musical talent to the streets of Bristol and Nottingham at the end of the month. Both cities have a range of big and small venues hosting shows, allowing for the opportunity to select from a strong choice of acts and genres.

For Dot to Dot 2022 there’s an impressive list of breakthrough artists included who, by the end of the year, are likely to be gracing much bigger stages. This includes… (deep breath)… Keg, Lime Garden, Honeyglaze, Bob Vylan, BDRMM, Powerplant, Retro Video Club, Prima Queen and many more.

Already established on the live circuit, the likes of Squid, Ghetts and Alfie Templeman will also be performing. There really is loads to pick from – see the poster for more details with further announcements still to be made.

We’re looking forward to sharing our highlights with you soon, and if you haven’t got your tickets yet, there is still some limited availability here.

Dot to Dot Festival

Words by Siobhan

18th May 2022

The Great Escape Festival 2022

The Great Escape, Brighton, 12th-14th May 2022

After three long years, The Great Escape returned to Brighton, a showcase for new music like no other as every corner of the city is only a pebble’s throw from the next venue. With hundreds of artists playing daily, it’s impossible to capture more than a fraction of the festival. Given that its whole ethos is about discovering new music of every kind from the local, national and international scene, and that we’re always looking to do the same, we’re bringing you our highlights and putting the spotlight on five featured artists from varying genres who we feel deserve to be shouted about. Inevitably there are others we would’ve liked to meet and feature too, but there’s always another time.

So, 3 days of sunshine, over 450 artists on the line-up (not even counting all the Alt Escape shows), 54,842 steps walked, and it all kicked off with the chance at last to catch Fräulein play one of their many sets of the weekend at Queen’s Hotel. An assured start to the day, and already bumping into friends old and new.

The variety of what was available to see on both the main and Alt stages didn’t take long to surface as we caught new to us She’s in Parties (Unbarred) and Tony Njoku (Shortt’s Bar), then later the awesome Pozi, who received loads of support from the crowd as they deftly tried to battle through really painful sound issues at Revenge.

Across the course of the weekend there were some incredible solo artists to witness too; on point electronica from Michael Georgian at The Pipeline, a heart-warming set in the gorgeous surroundings of St Mary’s Church from Douglas Dare, and a slick prowl around the Coalition basement with Sinead O’Brien.

Always bringing a bit of fun to the table, excellent stuff as expected from The Bug Club at Brighthelm, and if there’s a vest to be ripped you can rely on Priestgate to do the honours, frantic as ever in their animated performance at Unbarred.

Medicine Cabinet made their mark with a strong set, a big crowd and a plastic sword that can only ever add value at One Church, and the wonderful Audio Books once again gave a masterclass in playing live at Horatio’s Bar.

Well, we promised you featured artists and here they are. In no particular order, we think there’s something here for everyone. Check them out if you haven’t already and let the memories of the weekend soak away the blisters on your feet ( a beautiful picture to paint I know, you’re welcome).

deep tan

Intriguing, enchanting and with stabbing riffs that demand a space to stay rent-free inside your head, London based deep tan are amassing a following and lots of media interest, but are still way less exposed than they deserve to be. Not surprising that those who were watching for the first time immediately asked when they could see them again, and those who weren’t present at Shortt’s Bar who I spoke to later in day were genuinely annoyed that they’d missed them.

There are bands that sound good on record and there are bands that hit the nail on the head when they play live. A thing of joy when the two collide, deep tan do both consistently and faultlessly. Their latest EP diamond horsetail is out now – dip in and be prepared to stay for a long swim.

C’est Karma

Hailing from Luxembourg, C’est Karma offers up a heady mix of electronic music coupled with vocals that range at times from frenetic to blissfully peaceful, a touch reminiscent of Sugarcubes era Björk, updated to reflect the skills of an artist who can grab your attention with just themselves and a table of tech onstage.

Addressing the gender gap and the joy that comes from a bowl of pasta (two pretty serious issues, let’s be honest), Karma seems wise beyond her years. With a calm and unassuming presence, she comes to life on stage at Brighthelm and is definitely one to watch. New EP Amuse-Bouche has just been released, get ready to be impressed.

Banji

On their first trip to Brighton, Dutch four-piece Banji are here to provide a big old dose of indie, tinged with a soulful undertone and the energy of a freshly opened can of summertime. The breezy exterior belies some deeper lyrics though, as they sing about the pressures of existence amidst pop art style explosions of samples and Devo-esque production.

Their debut album Freshcakes is due for release via PIAS Recordings in October and, judging by the reaction from the crowd at Latest Music Bar, they’ll be very welcome back for their second visit to the city to play it, whenever that may be.

Honeyglaze

Managing to combine an incredibly accomplished sound with a clear enjoyment of what they do, South London trio Honeyglaze are not only riding the crest of a wave of super talented breakthrough artists, they’re sitting right up there taking the reins. There are sprinklings of spoken word in their tracks but without the reliance so many bands hold to this, Anouska’s vocals are more than able to command the spotlight, a pure sounding hybrid of Alvvays and The Long Blondes with the class of both.

Their set at Unbarred was seamless, their self-titled album is out now and frankly, it’s just really, really good. Absolutely would recommend and it feels like this is just the beginning of something that will only get better and better. A happy discovery.

VLURE

It likely won’t come as a huge surprise to anyone who knows me who our last featured artist is. Dispelling the theory that you can have too much of a good thing, I headed down the pier to catch up with the inimitable VLURE before their set at Horatio’s Bar.

Confirming that they would only be playing one set at TGE “to keep it special”, we talked about the huge wave of musical talent coming out of Glasgow, something it’s always been famous for but seems right now to be unstoppable. “It’s a comparatively small city so it’s easy to get involved” they tell me, noting that lots of the current legion of bands all practice at Axiom and all support each other with lots of “healthy competition” (they’re heading to see their friends in Medicine Cabinet over the weekend). Then there’s a wealth of local venues to take your first steps in – Broadcast, The Hug and Pint and Nice N Sleazy to name a few.

Their previous visits to Brighton have undoubtedly been memorable for anyone attending their gigs but what’s their impression? With reference points ranging from Nick Cave’s 20,000 Days on Earth to how cold the floor is at Green Door, it’s good to know we’re not just known for Quadrophenia Alley and sticks of rock. Hopefully, the weekend will treat them well enough that they’ll want to come back soon. Check out their aptly named Euphoria EP.

The venue is justifiably rammed as they finally come on stage. It’s late, it’s hot, the performance is once again vehement in its total commitment to make sure each and every person in the crowd is immersed in a feeling of complete elation. No blood to my knowledge but certainly plenty of sweat and tears. 

I asked them how they do it, how they make every show more of an event than the last and there’s a fairly simple answer. “It’s just the way we do things, that’s who we are. That’s what it’s all about – just getting in front of people and giving it everything we have every single time, we can’t do it any other way”.

In an industry that encourages artists to saturate the market as they blindly covet the  momentary rush of a top three chart position, it’s easy to forget that music is about more than just money or status. It’s about what it means to people, how it makes you feel, how it cuts into your heart and lets you forget about everything else just for a few minutes. In a world of fakery and pretence, this is what matters, this is real… this is VLURE.

To all at The Great Escape, to all the artists featured and to everyone we met along the way, thank you for the past few days – see you next year, go get some sleep now.

The Great Escape

Words and photos by Siobhan

16th May 2022

DIY Alive Festival 2022

DIY Alive, London, 23rd April 2022

It’s always good to see a new festival staking its claim in the ring and, given their record for championing new music, the prospect of DIY Magazine as a contender was always going to be intriguing. The inaugural DIY Alive took place at the weekend at East London’s Oval Space, ably flanked by great venues at The Pickle Factory and Canvas across the road and Space 289 a few minutes walk away.

As you’d expect, an eclectic line-up to choose from. Our day got off to an impressive start with locals Human Interest, the rhythm section a shining light for the laid back vocals – an energy akin to The Cramps without the psychobilly twang, and who doesn’t love a standing drummer?

Next, to the main stage to witness Chilli Jesson’s new incarnation and material. Interesting to see how he’s starting to develop his own brand away from past indie classics. A solid crowd response to an early set, and a nod to the past for the old faithful fans, closing with Best of Friends. 

With their contemporary take on a contorted dystopian world, Legss felt like the perfect fit for the festival, starting with more familiar tunes then drifting into newer material. By the end your eyes were torn between watching them or watching the front rows trying to jump in time to awkward drum patterns and time signatures – that’s what happens in dystopia.

Continuing their whirlwind of shows, Baba Ali have honed a slick performance, their blend of soulful vocals against a rock/electronic background a thing of beauty. Understated but impossible to ignore, a welcome addition to any line-up.

Something different as the DIY Alive experience included workshops and in conversation events alongside the music. Anyone who’s read Baxter Dury’s book Chaise Longue will know it’s full of tales of growing up in what might seem like a pretty bohemian world but, as he says, you don’t know any different when you’re a kid. There was plenty of opportunity for this to be an uncomfortable chat as a keen to please audience seemed ready to laugh at his every word, maybe not gauging that some of the stories might be funnier from the outside than in. Dury however took control and guided the tone of the discussion graciously, sharing glimpses into his upbringing, his love for Kendrick’s music and much more. An easy raconteur for sure, hopefully there’s another book in the offing. (I’d love to hear someone interview him without mentioning you know who just once).

And then VLURE. It never gets easier to describe VLURE playing live without sounding like a gushing child. The intensity and intimacy of their set, whatever size venue they’re in, makes for a very special experience. The relatively small stage at Space 289 never really caused a concern as so much of their time is spent in the crowd anyway. At this point, they’re so good it feels like the only people VLURE have to outdo is themselves… and still they do it every time. A band with a seemingly limitless ceiling; it’s tantamount to watching a block of flats being demolished. If it didn’t feel genuine it would be weird, but there’s no shadow of insincerity here. Euphoria indeed.

Over at The Pickle Factory, Jessica Winter once again wowed with her off the scale vocals. For self proclaimed sad music, what she produces makes people surprisingly happy. It can be difficult to compete as a solo performer with a backing track, but it says a lot when just you, your keyboard and laptop still stand out against a backdrop of full bands.

Back at Oval Space, no surprise that Shame drew the biggest crowd. Amidst extensive touring, they’re well versed in whipping up a crowd frenzy, and despite it being hard to be a bigger band nowadays, they’re still gaining fans to surf across and taking the most likely to cause a moshpit award.

Time for one last set and, from the get-go, Audio Books sounded like the best of Chris and Cosey, while displaying a persona and performance all of their own. Captivating dark techno with lyrics spat like a challenge, they couldn’t have done a better job to round off the night and the encore, though a thing less prescient these days, was well deserved. Some like to mosh, others like to dance – if you’re a dancer head for Audio Books.

Day 2 looked set to be just as enjoyable with more fantastic breakthrough artists – Fräulein, Keg, Phoebe Green and Lily Moore to name a few.

Big thanks to DIY for having us along. Their plan to bring ‘the spirit of DIY Magazine to the heart of East London’ an unquestionable success – look forward to seeing what next year brings.

DIY Alive | DIY Magazine

Words / Photos by Callum / Siobhan

25th April 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landlubber Music Festival 2022

Landlubber Music Festival, Barnsley, 9th April 2022

A brand new grassroots festival emerged from the depths of the pandemic during April. Situated in the fantastic Birdwell Venue, just off the M1 at Barnsley, this event was Quality (with a capital ‘Q’) from start to finish. The venue, recently refurbished, has outstanding sound and lighting, with live screens throughout the venue, so you never need to miss a thing!

Looking down the programme of artists, you just knew this would be a fantastic day! Opening act, Canadians In Space, were hilarious! They would have benefitted from being further down the list for a greater audience, but they were playing more than one gig that day. Do check them out: tremendous musicians, but their songs are laden with a good old Yorkshire sense of philosophy, leaving the audience with some fantastic earworms that might get you slung out of the supermarket if you were singing them aloud!

Huddersfield Alternative Grime Rock band were also moving on to another gig, this time in Mamchester. Loud, energetic and with a conscience, these guys were in complete contrast to the previous act, a real selling point for future events: a broad selection of genres.

In contrast again came 15-year old Dan Ottewell-Naish, a young man so clearly inspired by The Levellers. What a talent he is! Great songs. Great guitar playing. Huge stage confidence! A really humble young man off stage. Lovely to see!

The wonderfully named Frank Grimes and The Disasters (a Simpsons reference) continued the diversity with their Punk/Pop/Rock set, reminiscent of bands such as Green Day, The Offspring and Smashing Pumpkins.

Warsop’s Caution Horses played a great set, even though they were a man down, followed by more Warsop talent, the very funny and entertaining Star Botherers.

The final 4 bands of the day can all be found in the same circuits. Firstly, the wonderful Celtic Punk Black Water County, filling the stage with that wonderful penny whistle sound that makes you want to swing a pint and jump up and down!

Following on, came Sheffield new favourites, Shanghai Treason, described as ‘Yorkshire Flatcap Punks.’ Their front man, vocalist Sam Christie, was largely responsible for the whole event , so he fully deserved all the accolades that day!

Penultimate performers were the raucous Roughneck Riot, from Warrington. They filled the stage with energy and angst and Punkish excitement!

The Barstool Preachers gave a phenomenal performance of Ska and Punk to close the day. Their frontman, TJ McFaull, strides the stage and delivers with passion and vehemence the band’s tirades against the injustices within society.

This was a day with a social conscience. A day full of top music, with musicians of all ages having their say and entertaining a welcoming crowd.

All credit to Sam Christie of The Gig Cartel and his team at The Birdwell for putting on one hell of a show! Bring on the next one!

Landlubber Music Festival

Words and photos © Tina Sherwood at AlltheTs Photography

16th April 2022

Preview – The Great Escape Festival 2022

The Great Escape, Brighton, 11th – 14th May 2022

Returning after the enforced pandemic hiatus, there is much anticipation for this year’s Great Escape. As regular and makeshift venues fill their stages with a huge variety of artists, Brighton will once again become the focus of emerging musical talent from around the world. And looking at the line-up for 2022, this is going to be a very welcome comeback.

With an already solid base of acts in place, The Great Escape have just announced 180 more, including Rachel Chinouriri, Goat Girl, Crows, Kid Brunswick and NOAHFINNCE. With the likes of Bob Vylan, English Teacher, Fat Dog, Fräulein, Pozi and VLURE already in the mix (and that’s just a tiny selection of the 450+ artists confirmed so far), careful planning and your best walking shoes are going to be essential.

And whilst you’re there, away from the regular tourist trail there are heaps of great independent shops, cafés and bars to check out.

Take a look at the full line-up in all its glory, grab your tickets on The Great Escape website and we’ll see you by the seaside very soon.

Words and photo by Siobhan

5th April 2022