Interview – Grapefruit

Hailing from Kent and bringing atmospheric indie tunes to the table, five piece Grapefruit release their enchanting new single into the world today. Get to know the band and take a listen to Soak below…

Give us a quick introduction to Grapefruit…

Grapefruit are a five piece female fronted band from all over Kent – we’re a bit of a clumsy mish-mash of old friends and strangers meeting online. Grace (guitar) and Angela (vocals) started Grapefruit a little while after finishing school and then met James (drums) through a desperate online search. Ollie (bass) was James’ best mate who came along to our first ever gig and joined us straight after that. We played like that for a year or so before Lew (guitar), a childhood friend of Ollie’s, came to see us audition for Pride in a drag bar and he’s been with us ever since.

It’s hard to describe what we aim for except to see what happens when we all come together with our vastly different music tastes to create music that isn’t what we are all used to hearing. Debating the value of country music can be helpful for creative flow it turns out.

Tell us about your new single Soak

Soak is the perfecting of the very first thing we started playing when Lew came along to his first practice with us. He instantly clicked with us and we love the music we are making with him now.

The song is about the feeling of dissociating, we live in a world that is so overwhelmingly chaotic and cluttered that you can lose yourself as life rushes past. The song is loud, intense and relentless, which is like the experiencing of dissociating sometimes.

There’s a fair amount of festival activity around Kent (By the Sea and Folkestone Psych Fest spring to mind), has it been a supportive environment for you growing as a band?

Maidstone’s been a bit of a hub for us; it’s Ange and Grace’s hometown and we’ve played Maidstone Fringe Fest a couple of times. Just this year we’ve been picking up a bit locally; we played the Fringe Festival and Hope Festival this year and we’ll also be playing the Faversham Beer and Music Festival in July. It’s exciting to get this support.

What’s been your favourite live show or venue that you’ve played to date?

Get in Her Ears are an incredible collective who promote women and femme people in music; we played for them at Notting Hill Arts Club and really enjoyed it. It was already a nostalgic place for us because it was one of our first ever gig venues back when the band had just started with three members, so it was really cool to come back with more members and more music and more experience, plus to play alongside other really talented female fronted bands. We also found out that night that our new single (Black and Blue) had gotten played by BBC Introducing!! We spent a lot of the night enjoying the really good vibes and dancing.

There seems to be a flurry of articles questioning whether streaming is killing or saving the music industry – what’s been your experience?

It’s a hard question. On the one hand, you could say streaming is killing the industry – 1,000 plays equates to no money for the artist whereas 1,000 single sales would’ve been £990 before. It’s somewhat harder to get somewhere and make a living making music. On the other hand, it is allowing small bands/artists to take control of their own music. Maybe it’s changed the music industry as opposed to killed it and it’s all about adapting to the times.

And what are you planning and hoping for during the rest of 2019?

We are writing and recording and releasing all year. It’s been really good to focus on new music and we’re trying to pick up the pace and spread the Grapefruit vibe.

You can listen to Soak now and keep up with the latest news from Grapefruit here

Header Photo © Jon Mo, B/W photo © fillm

28th June 2019

 

New Music – Frankie Cosmos, Fast Trains (Ban Summers Remix), SadGirl

New releases – Frankie Cosmos, Fast Trains (Ban Summers Remix), SadGirl

A single, a remix and an album – if you’re looking for some fresh new music we have all bases covered. Take 10 minutes of your time to sit back and enjoy the enchanting sounds and visuals of this latest selection of new music…

Frankie Cosmos – Windows

Ahead of new album Close it Quietly due out on 6th September, Frankie Cosmos release lead track Windows, a charming showcase for the melodic vocals of Greta Kline and scene-setter for the album and tour dates later in the year. Greta explains ‘This song takes place during the waiting period of healing, not knowing how to proceed or how to find the path to forgiveness. The inner versus the outer – learning to see yourself as part of the whole.’ Reflective, winsome pop to lighten your day, take a look at the video for Windows here…

Frankie Cosmos on Facebook

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Fast Trains – Measure by Measure (Ban Summers Remix)

Many a kind word has been rightly spoken about Fast Trains, the new project from songwriter and producer Tom Wells. Taking a new twist on the soft psychedelia looped guitars and vocals of recent release Measure by Measure, Edward Perry, aka Ban Summers, has remixed the track, adding different layers and a hint of industrialisation. Whether we have a new Portsmouth supergroup in the making or this is a one off collaboration, it makes for a refreshing listen and is a solid introduction to both artists if you’re not familiar with them already…

Fast Trains on Facebook    Ban Summers on Facebook

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SadGirl – Water

The LA trio’s new album Water is out now, made up of a series of recording sessions from the last two years using a variety of tape machines in different environments including home and studio recordings. Released back in April, Chlorine offers an insight into the story-telling encompassed in the new tracks, with more than a leaning towards early Marc Bolan vocals and a video portraying the fine line between innocence and toxicity. Hazy, soulful tunes aplenty, get a taster by checking out the video for Chlorine here…

SadGirl on Facebook

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Words by Siobhan
Frankie Cosmos header photo © Jackie Lee Young

24th June 2019

 

Exhibition – Get Up, Stand Up Now (Somerset House)

Exhibition – Somerset House, London, 12th June – 15th September 2019
Get Up, Stand Up Now – Generations of Black Creative Pioneers 

(Header shot: Fashion Shoot Brixton Market 1973 © Armet Francis)

Last week saw some inspiring new installations arrive within the Neoclassical walls of London’s Somerset House; Get Up, Stand Up Now is a collection that not only forms an important documentation of black creatives in Britain but also provides a vibrant treat for your eyes and ears.

Introduction from press release:

‘This summer, Somerset House celebrates the impact of 50 years of black creativity in Britain and beyond, with a landmark exhibition showcasing art, film, photography, music, literature, design and fashion. It is the first time that this distinguished group of approximately 100 artists are represented together, with their work articulating and addressing the black experience and sensibility, from the post-war era to the present day.

Historic artworks and new commissions sit alongside items from personal archives, much of which has never been seen by the public before. Through these original photographs, letters, films and audio clips, the exhibition connects the creative, the personal and the political, reflecting how artists have responded to the issues of our times.’

From the series ‘We are the Same’ © Campbell Addy

Get Up, Stand Up Now is curated by visual artist Zak Ové and begins close to home with work by his father, Trinidad born Horace Ové, who is widely credited as being the first black British feature film director (Pressure, 1975). Along with a group of his Windrush generation peers, Horace broke down barriers that encouraged younger multicultural artists to develop their own creativity and voices. Screenings of a selection of his films will form part of the exhibition. Amongst his contemporaries also exhibited are social documentary photographers Armet Francis, Charlie Phillips and Vanley Burke, often referred to as ‘the Godfather of black British photography’.

Still from Neneh Cherry, Kong 2018 © Jenn Nkiru

Elsewhere in the exhibition you can find exquisite stills and film from visionary artist and director Jenn Nkiru and stunning shots from high fashion photographer and film-maker Campbell Addy, photographer and visual activist Ajamu and Benji Reid, who describes his work as ‘choreo-photolist’, where theatricality, choreography and photography meet in a single or series of images. The exhibits individually are head-turning; in their entirety they form a fascinating collection of artistry covering the last 5 decades.

From Circus Master Series 1997 © Ajamu

Musical creativity also plays an integral part in the exhibition, with an exclusive soundtrack mixed by producer DJ Jillionaire streaming inside the gallery, a display of instruments and objects selected by musicians and live percussive performances on scheduled dates. And fashion is high on the agenda too, with a varied selection of sculptural exhibits including an Afro-futuristic cowboy from luminary designer Mowalola Ogunlesi.

Holding onto Daddy © Benji Reid 2016

All in all, Get Up, Stand Up Now offers an immersive experience covering all aspects of the arts. Given the obvious display of talent, it raises the question beautifully of why there isn’t more diversity on show at mainstream exhibitions across the country.

For anyone able to visit this coming weekend (22nd – 23rd June), there are some additional special celebrations taking place to mark National Windrush Day with Generation Get Up!

A host of free interactive events will encompass exclusive film screenings and talks (including a Q&A with actor, director and writer Kwame Kwei-Armah) and pop up studio Backgrounds offering the option to have a free professional portrait taken and share stories of identity and heritage, creating a new collective portrait of Britain today. There will also be an enticing selection of African and Caribbean street food stalls to tempt you before or after your visit.

Top left: Ishmahol Blagrove’s Free Speech Now
Top right: Yinka Shonibare’s Self Portrait (after Warhol)
Bottom: Yinka Shonibare’s Revolution Kid (Calf) and Sanford Biggers’ Woke
All 3 installation shots © Peter Macdiarmid

Get Up, Stand Up Now runs from 12th June – 15th September 2019

Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 1LA
Opening times: Mon – Tues and Sat – Sun 10 – 6, Wed – Fri 11 – 8 – please check the website for variable admission prices and further details of this and other exhibitions before visiting

All images and exhibition details are reproduced with permission from Somerset House and are copyrighted as credited

Words (excluding press release extract) by Siobhan

19th June 2019

 

 

 

Preview – 110 Above Festival

110 Above Festival, Twycross, 2nd – 4th August 2019

You have to wonder how much longer 110 Above Festival can be touted as ‘indie’s best kept secret’ as word continues to spread about what a great event it is. Now in its 10th year, there is no let up in the array of hugely popular artists playing, but the limited capacity of around 1,000 people and intimate stages on site will ensure that this remains a slightly more up close and personal experience than many other festivals. Set on the outskirts of Twycross on Gopsall Hall Farm, this year’s headliners tick the full set of indie boxes with new music from Swim Deep, the continuing rise of Pale Waves and the wonderfully named Eel Pie Island’s best known export, Mystery Jets.

The rest of the line-up is equally worthy of your attention – we had a chat with four acts you’ll be glad you didn’t miss over the weekend – look out for CHILDCARE, Hunger Moon, The Tin Pigeons and Hey Charlie…

CHILDCARE

For anyone just discovering the band, tell us a little about CHILDCARE and your music… 

We’re quite simply the best south London capslock soft-core psych quartet who are also running a revolutionary wellness campaign around.

Your album Wabi-Sabi has just been released to much acclaim – how long has it taken to put together and how does it feel now it’s out in the world?

It’s been a really long process actually because I kept thinking we weren’t ready to record an album. It was only when Emma (bassist) sat us all down and we listened to about 50 songs we’d recorded over the last 3 years that we realised it was probably time to put an album out. Now that the album is out fans are being healed all over the world.

Over the last year and through this summer you’re festival regulars – how does playing festivals differ to playing gigs, do you get a different reaction?

Festivals are fun because the crowds tend to be bigger, it’s glorious walking round on the grass in the sunshine and bumping into and watching other bands, but the gigs themselves are never as intense and focused as single shows.

What can people expect if they catch your set at 110 Above?

They can expect poise, personal glory, Chinese finger cymbals and hips.

And what else is on the horizon for CHILDCARE?

Continuing our Get Well Soon campaign, this will involve live healing at shows including the Radio 1 stage at Reading and Leeds, on a tour in September and at our biggest headline show to date, Scala in London in December. We’ll also be taking our Personal Glory™️ retreats round the country – events where we impart our twisted versions of mindfulness, meditation and yoga on fans.

Facebook    Spotify

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Hunger Moon

Photo © Laura Chen

Can you give us a quick intro to the band and your music?

Absolutely, we’re James and Natalie and we’ve been writing songs together as Hunger Moon since December 2017. We describe our sound as ‘melancholy alt pop’ and draw our songwriting inspiration from the world around us, from emotions to, more recently, current affairs.

Your latest single Honey is getting great reviews, how did the song come together and how does it feel to read people’s reactions to it?

Yeah, we were discussing only today how crazy the response to the track has been. We’re getting people around the world popping up on our socials now, and have had such a great response from radio and blogs already. It’s a really great feeling to know that something you’ve built from nothing is connecting and reaching not only with friends and their friends but with complete strangers too. We’ve been growing as an act with every release, and it really feels like the momentum is too.

What can everyone look forward to if they come and see you at 110 Above Festival?

Our usual set of emotional alt pop bangers. We love festivals as they’re a chance to play in front of completely new people in new places, so that always feeds into the adrenaline of our performances. We love meeting new people, so we’ll be looking forward to having a chat too.

If you were putting on your own festival and had no restrictions who would you choose to play alongside and headline?

We love Amber Run, if it wasn’t for those guys we wouldn’t be making music together, so we would definitely pick them. Aurora, Stereo Honey, The National and Radiohead would all make appearances too.

And what’s next for Hunger Moon?

We are playing a handful of festivals this summer before heading over to Europe for a week to play some dates in late September / early October. New music will hopefully follow!

Facebook    Spotify

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The Tin Pigeons

Say hello and tell us what it’s essential to know about Tin Pigeons…

Hey! Fraser and Thom here from Tin Pigeons! We think its pretty essential to know that we make music you can bounce to! Who doesn’t love a good bounce?

You’ve been described by BBC Introducing as ‘one of the best festival bands we know’ – what did you do to deserve such an accolade?

This comment came after we were named as Radio 1’s track of the week so they were showing us loads of love which was amazing, we just try and have as much fun as possible at our shows, and try and get people to dance along with us!

What have you got planned for your appearance at 110 Above?

We have been recording loads so we’ve got some brand new, hot-out-the-oven tunes to smash out!

Which other artists have you been listening to lately?

We have a load of mates all making music that we LOVE – we’ve been listening to loads of our good pal Lauran Hibberd who is sick!

And what does the future hold for the band?

More music! Working on touring plans for winter, then more studio time and new releases out very soon!

Facebook    Spotify

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Hey Charlie

© Victoria Holmgren 

Introduce us to Hey Charlie and your music…

We are a pop-rock band combining crunchy guitar riffs with sugar pop melodies. We manage, book and style ourselves and are trying to challenge the expectations of what it means to be a band in 2019.

What’s your desert island disc (ok, you can choose 2 each)?

Jimmy Eat World – The Middle
Neck Deep – in Bloom
The Band Camino – Daphne Blue
Bloxx- Headspace

Any top festival tips?

Talk to strangers and go see a random band you don’t know.

What’s in store for your set at 110 Above Festival and who else is playing that you’d like to see?

We have a new guitarist! So you can meet her…
We can’t wait to see Bloxx and Indoor Pets!

And what’s happening for the band in the coming months?

We’re touring the UK in July which we’re super excited about! We’re writing a lot of music at the minute and planning on getting in the studio over the summer.

Facebook    Spotify

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Lots more information and remaining tickets for 110 Above Festival available here – be quick to get in on that best kept secret…

Photos reproduced with artists’ permission

17th June 2019

Live – Hey Colossus at The Loft

Hey Colossus, The Loft, Southsea, 7th June 2019

Hey Colossus have been melting minds for 16 years now, and I’m led to believe that this is their first time playing in Portsmouth. It’s chucking it down with rain outside, but The Loft is absolutely rammed with eager punters tonight. The temperature is rapidly rising, and by the time the sextet hit the stage, most of us are already drenched in sweat. This is going to be good.

Tonight’s 10 song set draws chiefly from the band’s last four studio albums – Four Bibles (2019), The Guillotine (2017), Radio Static High (2015) and In Black and Gold (2015) – with an unreleased song thrown in for good measure. Sisters and Brothers gets things off to a steady start before the three pronged attack of new tracks, Four Bibles, Palm Hex / Arndale Chins and Memory Gore bring a heaviness and groove that sets the tone for the rest of the evening.

Hop the Railings deviates slightly by adding the motorik pulse of krautrock legends, Can, to proceedings before unreleased track Medal brings the noise once again. After that, it’s just one giant slab of noise rock after another, and the band really start to hit their stride.

Frontman Paul Sykes is clearly enjoying himself as he dances around and uses his microphone stand to engage with audience members filming on their phones. The rhythm section consisting of bass player, Joe Thompson, and drummer, Rhys Llewellyn, are the tight driving force that makes this band one of the best around. The addition of Chris Summerlin (Grey Hairs, Kogumaza, Haress) to the three guitar line-up adds another dimension of well-crafted tone and volume that ensures that last song, Back in the Room, is a bona fide skull crusher to end the night on a high.

Hey Colossus have worked incredibly hard to get where they are today, and they’re on a roll at the moment. Go see them in a small venue like this before they become colossal.

Setlist:

Sisters and Brothers
Four Bibles
Palm Hex / Arndale Chins
Memory Gore
Hop the Railings
Medal
Black and Gold
Experts Toll
Wired Brainless
Back in the Room

You can find more tour dates and the latest news from Hey Colossus here

Words by Ryan Howarth
Photos by Hannah Mesquitta

11th June 2019

Live – Utopia Brighton

Utopia All-Dayer, The Green Door Store, Brighton, 8th June 2019

After a successful first year in 2018, the Utopia all-dayer was back with a vengeance at the weekend. Brighton’s much loved Green Door Store was transformed with psychedelic light projections by Innerstrings and played host to a great selection of live music throughout the day.

Prior commitments meant that I had to skip the opening acts but I’m reliably informed that Buddha Blood and Rainn Byrns got things off to a flying start and, having seen Mystic Peach before, I can vouch for the quality of their live performance. Happily, I arrived in time to catch Public Body – made up of familiar faces from other Brighton bands, their combined forces result in some infectious post punk tunes and drew a good crowd still early in the day.

Next up, John Myrtle proved a popular choice with a definite 60s lilt to his stories within songs. From How Can You Tell If You Love Her to Cyril the Slug, everyone was pretty much captivated from start to finish.

It’s rare to have an event like this without at least one act dropping from the bill and sadly Kagoule were unable to play as planned on the day. Disappointing as they’re always on point live and also, when you only have two females on the line-up, it’s a damn shame to lose one of them.

Nonetheless, no complaints about their replacement as local duo Skinny Milk were drafted in at the eleventh hour and played a blistering set as expected, an excellent substitution.

Beachtape’s fuzzy indie tracks have seen them become an established feature on the Brighton scene and continued support for them is apparent with tracks old and new in Slow and Fix It Up equally well received.

Much anticipation for new project Nancy turned out to be well deserved. Another familiar face on the local circuit was preceeded by the rest of the band set up on stage and a single mic stand placed strategically in the crowd. With live appearances starting to pop up, the mystery frontman has been revealed as Tigercub’s Jamie Hall but, make no mistake, this is a far cry from heavy grunge and ripped jeans territory. More akin to The Cramps mix of raucous punk and laid back lounge swaying, Nancy raised the pace and atmosphere in the venue to a different level; one to watch for sure.

Always compelling live, Hotel Lux bring a turbulent hybrid of post-punk and pub rock, lyrics writhing in humour of the bleakest variety. They were a big favourite on the day and it’s not hard to see why. Dystopian disdain at its best, Hotel Lux never disappoint.

And so to the headliners, Heavy Lungs. The band launched straight into Half Full and Jealous; the crowd launched straight into a mosh pit. Reminiscent of early Killing Joke, the Bristol four piece lived up to their reputation for providing a raw assault to the senses and a certain ordered chaos throughout the room. It’s a positive note to end the day on, the last charge of the party brigade before curfew.

I can’t fail to mention the impeccable timing throughout the day. Despite having 10 bands to accommodate and relatively short gaps between sets, everything ran to schedule, almost to the second (having the set times projected onto the wall between acts is also a stroke of genius). Add to this a nicely assorted mix of artists on the line-up and a really friendly crowd and Utopia can tick off their second successful outing on their way to becoming a regular event on the  Brighton music calendar.

Words and photos by Siobhan

10th June 2019

Interview – Outer Spaces

From the heart of Baltimore, a city with music running through its veins, Cara Beth Satalino brings a new album from her indie-pop project Outer Spaces, drawing vocal comparisons with the likes of Stevie Nicks and Soccer Mommy. A collection of tracks full of clear melodies and reflective lyrics, the result is a cathartic and emollient body of work. We spoke to Cara Beth to find out more about the inspiration for her songs and the eclectic set of artists she listened to in the process of writing and recording.

Your new album Gazing Globe is out on 28th June – how long has it been in the making and who’s been involved?

It’s been quite a long process actually. I started writing some of these songs about three years ago. In 2017 I took a little break from playing shows to finish writing and I demo-ed everything myself at home before going into the studio, so I had a very good idea where I wanted things to go. I recorded the record at Tempo House in Baltimore, working with Chester Gwazda and Jared Paolini in March of 2018. My good friend and former band-mate Rob Dowler played drums on all of the tracks and Chester played the bass and keys.

In the process of making the album, you said that you were reflecting on a period where you were ‘obsessed with finding music from the past that has a cult following now, but never really ‘caught on’ at the time it was released, either because it was ahead of its time or simply because no-one had really heard it’. Which artists did you have in mind that you’d recommend?

One of my favourite albums is East and West by Anna Domino. It’s incredible, and so innovative. I listen to it weekly. Linda Perhacs’ record Parallelograms is another favourite. Lizzy Mercier Descloux and Vivien Goldman. It seemed to me that there were so many women making amazing music and going largely unnoticed. I also fell in love with the music of Francis Bebey, Ernie Graham and The Cleaners from Venus.

Tell us some more about Gazing Globe and what we can expect.

When I wrote a lot of the songs on Gazing Globe I was doing some exploration of my inner self, starting a daily meditation practice. A few of the songs reference another person, who is most likely myself. The title track came to me more like a vision. I liked the image of a gazing globe on a moonlit night. In the song, the character is compelled to explore the garden after dark, in a sleepy haze, further disoriented by the distorted reflection of themselves and their surroundings. They are looking for this person whose reflection they see, but it’s really just them all along. It’s kind of a metaphor for the trap of self-improvement. Basically, Gazing Globe is a record about learning to soften to yourself and really love yourself.

 

How does it differ from your past work and what’s influenced this?

People have told me since I was young that my songs were ‘sad’, which I’ve always hated. As if there are two feelings: happy and sad. What a boring and limiting way to experience the world. I think on my last two records I was trying to make the ‘sad’ songs more peppy, more upbeat, more poppy. With this record I was trying to get outside the box with my songwriting and guitar style. On Paper Flowers that meant letting go and deliberately choosing a very simplistic chord progression, losing that sense of ‘structure’ completely. On songs like I Slowly Close my Eyes I was really trying to make this windy guitar part that kind of pulls you along gently, but doesn’t feel complicated. I was just getting into meditation and I was trying to express my experience of it through music.

What’s your local music scene like in Baltimore at the moment?

After a bit of a slump, it seems like it’s really starting to come back. A few of my favourites have or are about to release new music this year. I’m especially into Abdu Ali’s new record. Baltimore is home to so many amazing artists so it’s nice to feel like the music scene is thriving again.

And what’s next for Outer Spaces?

I’ve already started writing for a new record, though I haven’t made my mind up yet about how it will sound. I’ve been working on stripping things down and doing more solo performances, so I’d imagine it will be a bit more sparse, but time will tell. In the meantime, we’ll be hitting the road and touring a bunch this summer.

Gazing Globe is released on 28th June via Western Vinyl; for a taste of what’s to come you can listen to latest single Album for Ghosts here and follow Outer Spaces for updates on future releases and live dates.

Header photo © Chester Gwazda

7th June 2019

Preview – Y Not Festival

Y Not Festival, Pikehall, 25th – 28th July 2019

It’s incredible to think that Y Not started life as a house party and is now heading into it’s 14th year as one of the largest UK festivals. Set in the rolling hills of the Peak District, this year sees as impressive a line-up as ever of big names from the indie, rock and alternative world – expect huge performances from headliners Elbow, Two Door Cinema Club and Foals across the 3 days.

Elsewhere, the Giant Squid stage hosts a brilliant line-up including two Dublin bands that  everyone’s clamouring to see in the shape of Fontaines DC and The Murder Capital – if you haven’t been able to pick up tickets for their live shows recently this is a great chance to catch them. On the same stage, soak up some acid-washed fuzz from Psychedelic Porn Crumpets, look out for some uncompromising lyrics and jagged refrains from the excellent Hotel Lux and don’t miss the powerhouse cacophony that is Demob Happy – always a set to remember.

Check through the full line-up poster to see the complete array of artists playing over the weekend, along with top names from comedy and The Nighthawk Cinema offering some downtime from the music on site.

Remaining tickets and all the other information you need can be found here.

Words and live photos by Siobhan

6th June 2019

 

 

Interview – Diving Station

Ever feel that things are spinning by too quickly and you’d like to just stop, contemplate and enjoy the moment? Then you’ll appreciate not just the sentiment behind Diving Station’s new single Film but also its soothing, multi-layered mix of emotive vocals, melodies and atmosphere. George and Sean tell us how it all came about, what’s coming next and give a shout out to some other great artists, venues and people who’ve helped them along the way…

Introduce us to Diving Station – who’s involved and how did you get together as a band?

George: Hello! We’re a band made up of Anna McLuckie on clàrsach and vocals, Sean Rogan on guitar, George Burrage on bass and Barney Kimberley on drums and vocals. We came up with the term ‘harp-driven dream pop’ and it seems to have stuck for now! Each member is originally from a different corner of the UK (Edinburgh, Manchester, Reading and the Isle of Man) but we all met whilst studying music in Manchester, bonding over similar influences such as Bon Iver, Radiohead and Bombay Bicycle Club. From then we started writing songs, doing gigs around Manchester and here we are 4 years later!

Your latest single Film has just been released – what’s it about and what’s the reaction to it been like so far?

Sean: Film is a story of struggle and frustration in a world that moves so fast we’ve no time to reflect on and deal with our own thoughts. The reaction to it has been wonderful, and we couldn’t be more grateful for the support, especially from the likes of BBC 6 Music and Introducing, it means a lot! This is the quickest turnaround between writing and recording we’ve ever had, so it’s exciting that some of our fans that have watched us live haven’t even heard it yet, but they seem to like it so far!

You’re based in Manchester, much lauded for its music – what’s going on there currently that we should know about?

George: Manchester International Festival is happening again next month. The line-up of music and art is incredible so I’d encourage anyone to attend. Sounds From The Other City Festival in Salford is also fantastic, as well as Dot to Dot and Manchester Jazz Festival, all of which took place in May. There’s always so much music to see from a ridiculous amount of good venues like Band on the Wall, Gorilla, YES, Eagle Inn, Fuel Cafe, Deaf Institute, Dulcimer, Albert Hall and many more. Through studying together, we’ve met some great bands like Paige Kennedy, Cosmo Calling, HAZY, Sylvette, Darcie and Porij.

You’ve toured across the UK – any special venues or standout memories?

George: We recently played a gig in Leeds at the lovely Hyde Park Book Club. Our friends Heir organised the night, colourfully exhibiting local artists around the venue, and we were on the bill with Caro. They’re an exciting band and we were lucky enough to have them support us at our EP launch earlier that month.

Are You Listening? is a great charity festival in Reading. We were on early but there was a big crowd that seemed passionate about finding new music throughout the day. We also had some downtime and managed to sneak in a country walk which always helps.

What’s the hardest thing about trying to make your name in the music business and what or who has helped you on your way?

Sean: I think the hardest thing is simply making yourself heard by those that can help you move forward. To reflect on what we said about our latest single, the world moves so fast that we can release a song, get a super enthusiastic response from our audience, then feel like we don’t even exist a month later. Staying on people’s radars is tricky, and I think someone that’s helped us a lot with staying in people’s heads is our artist, Amrit Randhawa. The aesthetic he’s created across our recent releases is so distinctive, and he taught us a lot about building a visual world around our music, something which we’d probably have left behind.

George: Brighter Sound’s mentoring programme has given me so much invaluable advice on the music business from industry professionals and musicians I admire. Ryan Paul and the BBC Introducing in Manchester team have also been incredibly supportive since our last EP Feather Mouth was released.

And what are you up to for the rest of the year?

Sean: Festival season is just kicking in and we’re super excited to be off to Glastonbury to perform on the Toad Hall stage, as well as Bluedot, Tramlines Fringe and EskFest. After that, we’ll be releasing another single, along with a headline gig at YES in Manchester and a short UK tour surrounding it. Outside of that we’re still writing away, and forever trying to catch up with recording the backlog of songs we’d love to share with the world!

Listen to Film now and follow Diving Station here

Photos © Oliver Pringle
Film artwork by Amrit Randhawa

5th June 2019